Posted by: Dead in 1 year or less | February 1, 2011

INSIGHTS – HOW’S YOUR WORK GOING? PART 8 OF 9

INSIGHTS – HOW’S YOUR WORK GOING?

PART 8 OF 9

Cognitive problems can affect your performance at work.  Here is one man’s experience and how he manages.

I have memory loss, difficulty concentrating and trouble remembering names, appointments, errands to be completed and that appropriate word needed to finish a sentence.  Before I became aware that my symptoms were related to cognitive dysfunction and there were techniques to manage them, I thought, at times, my conversations with people made little sense.  I was also convinced that my IQ had dropped dramatically and that my ability to understand complex ideas was questionable.

Finally I went for a cognitive evaluation.  Now, I know that: this condition is treatable; my IQ is unchanged; my worry about not clearly conveying my thoughts during a conversation was wrong; and that I was much too critical of my abilities.  Yes, I have a problem, but I have learned how to live with it.

Here are some tips on managing this symptom:

  • Plan your most challenging cognitive tasks for your best time of day, and take breaks to avoid cognitive fatigue.
  • Keep a daily diary or notebook, or some form of digital organizer.  Write down all appointments, reminders and lists of things to do in one place.  Tick things off once they are done.  Get into the habit of referring to this diary routinely, perhaps at the same time each morning and again in the evening for tomorrow’s schedule.
  • When you make or receive a phone call, note the date, time, whom you spoke with and a short reminder about what was said.
  • During a conversation in which you feel you need to remember what is being discussed, repeat back what was just discussed to clarify the important points.  This aids in memory processing.
  • Maintain a regular routine or schedule.
  • Limit distractions as much as possible.  At work this may include not sharing your work space, confining yourself to a small cubicle of an office and closing the office door when necessary.

    Here are some tips on managing this symptom:

    • Plan your most challenging cognitive tasks for your best time of day, and take breaks to avoid cognitive fatigue.
    • Keep a daily diary or notebook, or some form of digital organizer.  Write down all appointments, reminders and lists of things to do in one place.  Tick things off once they are done.  Get into the habit of referring to this diary routinely, perhaps at the same time each morning and again in the evening for tomorrow’s schedule.
    • When you make or receive a phone call, note the date, time, whom you spoke with and a short reminder about what was said.
    • During a conversation in which you feel you need to remember what is being discussed, repeat back what was just discussed to clarify the important points.  This aids in memory processing.
    • Maintain a regular routine or schedule.
    • Limit distractions as much as possible.  At work this may include not sharing your work space, confining yourself to a small cubicle of an office and closing the office door when necessary.
    1. It’s all in your head
    2. The Impact of Cognitive Changes in MS
    3. The Emotional Effects of MS
    4. Managing the Congnitive and Emotional Effects of MS
    1. Gordon – At Work with MS
    2. MS WildPlay Warriors
    1. Latest Publications
    2. msdialogue Magazine

      There is normal tiredness and then there is fatigue due to MS

      There is ‘normal’ tiredness and then there is fatigue due to multiple sclerosis.  Although it is often overlooked and thus may go untreated, fatigue in MS compounds the impact of other symptoms, significantly reducing an individual’s overall quality of life.  Fatigue is cited by people with MS as the symptom that most affects their lives, even beyond problems with balance, weakness, numbness, pain or depression.  Its negative impact on the ability to carry out daily activities can extend to the point of affecting one’s ability to care for oneself.

      Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider promptly.

      You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read here.

      Users are urged, advised and specifically warned to seek the advice of a medical professional such as a physician before beginning any treatment.

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