Posted by: Thixia | June 19, 2008

Strategies For Stress Management 2 of 2

 

 

Self-Reward

– Increase your self-reward. Be good to yourself by treating yourself to study breaks, special outings, bubble baths, etc.

 

Rehearsal

– use your neutral scene to help you relax

­      rehearse yourself being competent, eg. asking a discussion provoking question in class

­      rehearse all outcomes to a situation so that in the event that any one occurs you are not taken totally by surprise.

­       

Cognitive Re-appraisal

– Learn to think differently about things

– think how a friend with a sense of humour would look at it. How would someone you respect evaluate the situation?

 

Effective Strategies

 

Work out an effective curriculum – Remember that it used to be possible to enjoy things. Go back to those old activities and old friends: If the latter isn’t possible, develop new friends who are like your old friends.

 

Learn to laugh at yourself and not take yourself or your actions so seriously.

 

Ask yourself

– will anyone know the difference a year from now?

 

Release Emotions

– Cry, laugh, pillow fight, kick doors, get rid of those pent-up feelings in ways which are not destructive to anyone else.

 

Skill Strategies

 

Build up good skills. If you are deficient, find a way to fill the gap.

Self-help literature. “How to Parent; How to form relationships; How to fight fair; How to start a conversation.

Courses offered through YMCA, Community Education, Church, Rotary, Community College.

 

Use Learning Principles

– Break down long term goals into smaller goal steps. This way, as you reach each step towards the major goal, you can feel like you are accomplishing something. Rewarding yourself for successful completion of each step will keep you directed, interested and satisfied.

 

 

Time Management Skills

– Learn how to manage time and priorities effectively. Make a realistic plan with lots of breathing spaces, and work your plan. Be in control of what is accomplished and reward yourself when you are successful.

 

 

Behavioural Rehearsal

 

Practise (what you want to do.)

  1. Observe someone who does it well and imitate them–modelling.
  2. Role play the situation – with a friend or in front of the mirror.
  3. Self-contracting – Make a contract with yourself or friend for something you want to do. Work out a system of rewards for successful completion of the goal or punishment (e.g. withholding going to a movie, studying for two extra hours, not watching the hockey game, etc.) if you fail to achieve your goal.
  4. Strengthen interpersonal bonds (between people) – Caring supportive relationships between friends and family feel good. Reduce tension resulting from those relationships. Couples weekends, communication workshops, parent effectiveness training, offered by schools and churches and social service agencies, and self-help literature will help you learn new ways of relating.
  5. Strengthen interpersonal bonds (within yourself). Yoga, meditation, values clarification, assertiveness training, etc.

 

Environmental Strategies

 

Arranging Consequences – Arrange for successful completion of goals by using strategies of self-reward – e.g. going to a move, or self-punishment – physical e.g. elastic band around your waist, or withdrawing a reward – not going to a movie you had planned on. This takes a great deal of willpower, so make your initial consequences easily obtainable and increase the steps as you are successful with each preceding one. If you don’t think you have the willpower, ask a friend to help you out by making a contract with him/her.

 

Environmental Support – Request extra support and assistance from your family and friends to help you through anxious or stressful times or situations. It isn’t necessary to be a martyr – your friends care about you.

 

Time Out – Take time out or private time from a stressful situation. Short breaks away from anxiety producing studying, etc. will help even out the stress.

 

Avoidance – If possible avoid situations which make you up uptight or anxious. If crowds make you anxious, avoid fairs, subways, theatre lobbies, etc.

Strategies For Stress Management 2 of 2

 

 

Self-Reward

– Increase your self-reward. Be good to yourself by treating yourself to study breaks, special outings, bubble baths, etc.

 

Rehearsal

– use your neutral scene to help you relax

­      rehearse yourself being competent, eg. asking a discussion provoking question in class

­      rehearse all outcomes to a situation so that in the event that any one occurs you are not taken totally by surprise.

­       

Cognitive Re-appraisal

– Learn to think differently about things

– think how a friend with a sense of humour would look at it. How would someone you respect evaluate the situation?

 

Effective Strategies

 

Work out an effective curriculum – Remember that it used to be possible to enjoy things. Go back to those old activities and old friends: If the latter isn’t possible, develop new friends who are like your old friends.

 

Learn to laugh at yourself and not take yourself or your actions so seriously.

 

Ask yourself

– will anyone know the difference a year from now?

 

Release Emotions

– Cry, laugh, pillow fight, kick doors, get rid of those pent-up feelings in ways which are not destructive to anyone else.

 

Skill Strategies

 

Build up good skills. If you are deficient, find a way to fill the gap.

Self-help literature. “How to Parent; How to form relationships; How to fight fair; How to start a conversation.

Courses offered through YMCA, Community Education, Church, Rotary, Community College.

 

Use Learning Principles

– Break down long term goals into smaller goal steps. This way, as you reach each step towards the major goal, you can feel like you are accomplishing something. Rewarding yourself for successful completion of each step will keep you directed, interested and satisfied.

 

 

Time Management Skills

– Learn how to manage time and priorities effectively. Make a realistic plan with lots of breathing spaces, and work your plan. Be in control of what is accomplished and reward yourself when you are successful.

 

 

Behavioural Rehearsal

 

Practise (what you want to do.)

  1. Observe someone who does it well and imitate them–modelling.
  2. Role play the situation – with a friend or in front of the mirror.
  3. Self-contracting – Make a contract with yourself or friend for something you want to do. Work out a system of rewards for successful completion of the goal or punishment (e.g. withholding going to a movie, studying for two extra hours, not watching the hockey game, etc.) if you fail to achieve your goal.
  4. Strengthen interpersonal bonds (between people) – Caring supportive relationships between friends and family feel good. Reduce tension resulting from those relationships. Couples weekends, communication workshops, parent effectiveness training, offered by schools and churches and social service agencies, and self-help literature will help you learn new ways of relating.
  5. Strengthen interpersonal bonds (within yourself). Yoga, meditation, values clarification, assertiveness training, etc.

 

Environmental Strategies

 

Arranging Consequences – Arrange for successful completion of goals by using strategies of self-reward – e.g. going to a move, or self-punishment – physical e.g. elastic band around your waist, or withdrawing a reward – not going to a movie you had planned on. This takes a great deal of willpower, so make your initial consequences easily obtainable and increase the steps as you are successful with each preceding one. If you don’t think you have the willpower, ask a friend to help you out by making a contract with him/her.

 

Environmental Support – Request extra support and assistance from your family and friends to help you through anxious or stressful times or situations. It isn’t necessary to be a martyr – your friends care about you.

 

Time Out – Take time out or private time from a stressful situation. Short breaks away from anxiety producing studying, etc. will help even out the stress.

 

Avoidance – If possible avoid situations which make you up uptight or anxious. If crowds make you anxious, avoid fairs, subways, theatre lobbies, etc.

 

 

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